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Miniature painting Miniatures Warhammer 40k

Musings on magnetizing minis and drilling barrels

Back when I got into minis in earnest this past February, I considered magnetization and boring out gun barrels, both of which share the same tool: a pin vise or hand drill. Given the outlay of cash and time to get an army rolling, and my long history of false starts and aborted attempts at getting into this hobby, adding another step (time) that required more tools (money) seemed like a bad idea — and one that might kill my momentum.

I’ve carefully guarded and maintained that momentum for eight months now, and occasionally considered magnetization and barrel-drilling but decided that the time wasn’t right. I also reasoned that if I encountered a need for a different bit of wargear on a unit in the future, since I’m building an army for the pleasure of it, buying that unit again and assembling it a new way wouldn’t be a bad thing.

Enter Moonkrumpa

But as I got my Deathskulls Ork army, Moonkrumpa’s Megalootas, off the ground, I stumbled across the rules for Moonkrumpa’s two special pieces of wargear, the Tellyport Blasta and the Kustom Force Field. With no clear date when I’ll actually be able to play 40k, I’ve held off on reading the rules; they’ll just fade away before I get a chance to play. And I make my choices almost entirely based on the Rule of Cool, so that’s worked out fine so far.

Somehow, though (probably by browsing DakkaDakka), I’ve picked up enough to understand that the KFF is probably a much better choice, mechanically, than the Blasta — despite the Blasta looking cooler. And these two parts both have a flat bottom and sit atop a single flat surface, making them perfect candidates for magnetization.

Further, this isn’t just a random unit in my Ork army — this is my first 40k character with a backstory, and he’s the leader of my entire Waaagh!. I’m invested in playing with Moonkrumpa in a way that I’m not invested in playing with Blood Angel X or Ork Y.

I’d also previously set aside my Contemptor Dread, whose weapon arm uses a ball joint that must be glued into place (rather than a peg, like the refrigerator Dreads, which allows for easy arm-swapping), to consider whether it’s worth delving into drilling and magnets for him. I have no plans to buy a second Contemptor (it’s kind of a bland kit), and in any case they can be expensive and difficult to track down.

So that gives me two units that both have what looks to be a single fairly simple spot on each that could benefit from magnetization — one of which is My Guy, to boot.

I’ve got a pin vise, some bits, and a mix of 2mm x 1mm and 3mm x 1mm magnets in the mail, and I’ve been doing some homework. There’s an awesome article on DakkaDakka, Magnetising: a Report, Tips and Tricks from a Newbie, that’s going to be my guide. I’ve also found some excellent tips on Reddit, notably about marking magnets and using bits of sprue to simplify the process and drill pressure, marking magnets, and pilot holes.

I’ll probably bore out a spare Bolter to see how that looks, and if it looks good I’ll have a minor existential crisis and then break down and drill every mini I’ve already painted…or maybe I’ll skip that, and just drill going forwards. We shall see!

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Blood Angels Space Marines Miniatures Warhammer 40k

Only $39,940 to go

Painting Terminators — which have been my favorite aspect of the Warhammer 40k universe since I was 12 — for Space Hulk piqued my interest in painting more 40k minis. I read the free rules first to test the waters, and I like what I see in 8th Edition. But like I said in that linked post, it’s the painting side of the hobby that’s drawing me back — paint for sure, play maybe.

In the grim darkness of the far future there is only a lightening of your wallet

There are a couple of local stores (Mox Boarding House, GW Lynnwood) that look like they could be avenues of play for me down the road, but the joy of falling in love with an army and building and painting minis for it is what’s grabbing me right now.

I’ve also started watching battle reports for the factions that interest me. So far MOARHAMMER is my favorite channel, conveying a sense of what it was like to be there in a fun way with crisp editing, a friendly vibe, and — unlike several others I’ve tried! — excellent camera work that doesn’t give me motion sickness. This Adeptus Custodes v. Black Legion BR was my intro to them, and it’s a fun watch.

I’m enjoying reacquainting myself with this universe and game — and holy shit is there a lot of lore available in wiki format (which of course didn’t exist in the early ’90s). I visited this Blood Angels page and figured it’d be a couple screens of text at most. Oh, how wrong I was.

Which is cool, because it’s making deep dives into faction lore pretty easy to do without investing in like 18 books. Good times!

(The title of this post is based on a 40k joke: It’s not called Warhammer 40,000 because it’s set in the 41st millennium, but because that’s how much it costs to play. I don’t know the joke’s origin, but I love it.)